Compassion (i.e. come to passion)

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“Human it is to have compassion on the unhappy.”
Giovanni Boccaccio

Use your imagination a bit and compassion looks like “come to passion.”

It’s a good reminder since sometimes when I get too close to pain, I slip from compassion to control. The reason this happens? I’m terrified of pain.

I want to fix whatever is wrong, to stop others from hurting. My eagerness to make everything better leads to offering solutions, usually too many.

When hurting friends don’t take my advice, I get uncomfortable and back away.

It was never so obvious as when a friend’s son died several years ago. Slowly I drifted farther from our relationship. I had a lot going on myself, so I justified the distance. However, I was painfully aware I felt incapable of being around her pain.

I thought back, wondering where the discomfort originated. When my aunt’s mother died, I was four years old. I sat in the bed where she spent most of her days crying.

“I’ll never be happy again,” she said.

I told her she would, but she said no.

She looked so sad. I tried to brighten her gloomy mood by giving her attention, telling funny stories, and chattering. None were enough. I wanted to run away, but Mom said I had to stay. I was the only family member my aunt recognized, the result of being in shock, so it was my job to comfort her, but I failed.

Which brings to mind why relationships are so complicated. Their pain entangles with our pain. Their feelings jog our memories and give rise to our feelings. Reactions create chain reactions.

The best I can do sometimes is to let both of us feel whatever we’re feeling, sometimes at a distance.

To determine what we have to offer, we can check in with ourselves: Can I allow my friend to feel without trying to fix him/her? If not, what is the most loving way to respect each other’s feelings? If it’s space, what’s the most compassionate way to give it?

Write wHere I’m supposed to be – It’s okay to not show up for everyone. Sometimes we need our own compassion.

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9 responses »

  1. I cut and pasted these FB comments onto the blog, as a keepsake and encouragement.

    Linda Hopkinson said Absolutely beautifully put… I know where you are coming from! I feel your every word! Thank you for sharing
    10 hours ago · Like

    Kim Henson Thanks, Linda, for reading and commenting. It’s comforting to know I’m in good company.
    9 hours ago · Like

    Bonnie Leamon Ingalls said Great piece. But a little too heavy for me at 6:30 a.m.
    4 hours ago · Like

    Susan Blanton said Kim I have to agree..thank you so much for sharing! I saw so much of myself in those words! Very well put! Happy Mother’s Day!
    2 hours ago · Like

    Kim Henson ‎@Bonnie, thanks. Now go back to bed. Yawn. : 0 @ Susan, thanks. Again, … in good company. Have a wonderful Mother’s Day! I’m happy you’re here to celebrate it.
    about an hour ago · Like

  2. Kim, thank you for the devo on Compassion…something applicable to a situation I am facing…depressed,grieving death of her mother…haven’t kept in close contact w/ her for 20 years…when she contacts me wanting to “TALK”. Praying God will show me His direction for investing myself into her disturbed life, now & 20 years ago…

    • Hi Sheri, I know what you mean, there has to be a balance, especially since we all have life happen to us. A couple of my relationships became all-consuming. I felt like I was spending more time on their problems than they were. I thought maybe I was focusing on them to avoid myself but it’s a hard call when I think it may be time to take time away from a friend. Let’s pray for each other on this one.

  3. Kim, I understand what you are saying. I try to fix unpleasant situations in my life that are only fixable by the grace of God. I am learning there is where I need to go–to Him for the fixing. Have a wonderful Mother’s Day!

  4. Pingback: Isolated or Insulated (living safe with people) | S. Kim Henson ~ Getting Your Own Life while Loving the People in It.

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