The Benefit of an Emotional Meltdown

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“Sometimes it takes a meltdown to cool down.” Evinda Lepins

A recent meltdown I had wasn’t a public scene or even a really big deal around our house. It was significant enough, though, that I realized how important something was to me that I’ve been ignoring. I try to be preventative about these sorts of things, but sometimes prevention doesn’t work because of others’ reactions. My solution sounds something like this until I calm down, “I can’t believe I’ve let this go on,” “Never again,” and “I’m done.”

By my final fit, I’m left with what I used to think was an unusual outcome, but now I’ve come to expect it – an emotional hangover and a spiritual awakening. Like what Terrell Owens said, “Instead of me having a breakdown, I’m focusing on me having a breakthrough.”

Since I grew up in a silent family who shut up about their emotions and shut down everyone else’s, meltdowns ended up being the only way to figure out how I felt. It shouldn’t come as a surprise I married into a family that did the same thing because we’re attracted to what we know. They’re screamers, so I hoped they’d scream about their emotions so I could finally talk about mine. As it turned out, their screaming was also about shutting up and shutting down.

Shy on role models, I eventually learned to appreciate emotional meltdowns for what they were – a gateway to my emotions. Even though I’m still shaken by their messiness and hung-over feelings, and I fear I’ve made things messier instead of mending them, meltdowns haven’t let me down as long as I handle them constructively. I stop looking at what everyone else needs to do and, instead, I look at my part in the meltdown. I get in touch with how I feel and I decide what changes I want to make.

So, what’s actually melting away?

I used to hate to cry in front of people. I still do, but it helped when a friend said, “I love when you cry. You’re melting.”

I knew what she meant. I relaxed a little each time I cried around her. She could see me softening and I could feel it. For years I tried keeping up a happy pretense and a façade of being distant from my emotions by laughing off how I felt and saying, “I’m fine. Really, I am.”

I’m like Elf, “Smiling’s my favorite.” However, weightiness surfaced when I recognized emotions have a life of their own if we ignore them. Instead of being happy like Elf, we numb out with food, zone out on Facebook, and distract ourselves with problems we can’t fix, disturbing news reports, and our own bad habits. Sometimes we want to die when we already feel emotionally dead or our emotions (the ones we think we’re not supposed to feel) feel too out of control. I dislike being called “too sensitive” and hearing I overreact, but I dislike even more not being true to who I am and what’s going on inside of me.

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So, I melt.

I ask myself things like: What am I thinking? What am I feeling? What do I need? What do I want to change?

When I ignored the answers to these questions or didn’t bother to ask them at all, I ended up in a depression I almost didn’t survive. It’s like the anonymous quote, “I froze because frozen hearts don’t feel pain.”

I tried to give up feeling pain so I wouldn’t inconvenience others with my emotions. The result of freezing my pain was freezing almost all of my feelings. I was robotic. I went through the motions of life without emotion, or tried to. I felt like one of the walking dead and wondered what the point was of getting up each day.

This is when I had the meltdown of all meltdowns.

“On the other hand, I believe there’s hope, because the breakdown and the repair are happening simultaneously.” Kathryn Bigelow

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I cried for two years, or so it seemed. I broke my silence and told a couple of trusted friends about my depression and not feeling anything except hopelessness. I let my family know I felt desperate even though they didn’t want to hear it, not because they didn’t care, but because it was scary to listen to. I contained my meltdowns to our living room and limited the best I could my accusations, name calling, and cuss words. The more I talked, the more I was able to share my emotions constructively by talking about myself and how I felt and my plan for feeling better.

I stopped trying to get a thicker skin and focused on being kind to myself and talking about my pain. I got in touch with what my heart longed for instead of the chaos in my head. I had less severe emotional hangovers and more startling spiritual awakenings. I started healing from my meltdowns because I saw their value and handled them right.

When you melt down, do you know why it’s happening? Do you see its value? Do you ask the right questions? Our emotions and handling them right are key to melting well.

In This Together,
Kim

On the Side: My manuscript is about emotions and the value of getting in touch with how we feel. I’d love feedback from you about what to include and about what you’d like to read more about.

Thanks for the images, Pixabay.com.

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13 responses »

    • It’s true, Teresa, “… or they will deal with us.” I wish I had thought up that one. 🙂 I like sayings that are easy to remember and to the point. I appreciate your comment and you! ❤ Love.

  1. Well timed for me to read today Kim. Loved the images of the blue heart and the waterpot fountains, foreground bubbling and background looking frozen in the same image. The quote from Kathryn Bigelow put it nicely combining breakdown with simultaneous repair. “On the other hand, I believe there’s hope, because the breakdown and the repair are happening simultaneously.” All the quotes were perfect “Sometimes it takes a meltdown to cool down.” Evinda Lepins and your quote By my final fit, I’m left with what I used to think was an unusual outcome, but now I’ve come to expect it – an emotional hangover and a spiritual awakening. Like what Terrell Owens said, “Instead of me having a breakdown, I’m focusing on me having a breakthrough.”

    Love the way you so easily, it seems, approach personal and emotional issues in bite sizes.
    Thank you

    • Hi Joel,

      I thought the quotes were perfect too, and the images just sort of jumped out at me. I usually only include one quote, two at the most, but I kept finding ones that fit and they were good. I couldn’t choose among them, so I forced in all of them. 🙂 I’m a quote fanatic anyway, so maybe one day I’ll write an entire blog post with just quotes.

      It’s getting easier to write about the emotional issues and not stress about what others will think. The more I write and people respond, the more I’m convinced we all have the same stuff going on, maybe at different times in our lives, but we can all relate to at least some of what’s happening in each others’ lives. It’s comforting to be in this together.

      Thank you!

  2. Kim

    As I read your offering on “meltdown”, I wondered how meltdown was defined. I wasn’t certain you had a meltdown or a serious letdown. You then elaborated on your feelings and the end result: a spiritual experience.

    My close friend, Merriam W. defines a meltdown in three ways: the accidental melting of the core of a nuclear reactor, a rapid or disastrous decline or collapse, or a breakdown of self-control (as from fatigue or over-stimulation Digging a bit further I found another definition “A very fast loss of emotional self-control’

    Melting of the core intrigued me. The core is the center point or foundation of the substance E.G. where the magnetism of iron is located. Nuclear fission takes place in the core of the atom. The best definition for your experience is the “inmost or most intimate part”

    Having said all that, It would seem that we must go there to make any lasting or meaningful changes in ourselves. How one gets there may differ by meltdown, trauma or other loss, matters little. It is the place of human spiritual change and development.

    Thanks for the topic.

    Bob

    • Bob, I love what surfaced through your research. I do that same thing with words, and interesting insights usually bubble up.

      Melting intrigues me too. I especially appreciate your last paragraph, “It would seem that we must go there to make any lasting or meaningful changes in ourselves. How one gets there may differ by meltdown, trauma or other loss, matters little. It is the place of human spiritual change and development.”

      Meltdowns have certainly brought me to my knees and to that place of change and growth. You comment made me think even more about how grateful I am for melting.

      Love to you and Agnes! ❤

  3. From Facebook (Kim Henson) ~

    Delilah Lewis, Mary Blackmon and 14 others

    3 Shares

    Delilah Lewis So sorry that you had to have a meltdown
    Love · Reply · 1 · October 22 at 4:41pm

    Kim Henson Thanks, Delilah Lewis. It was necessary. 🙂 And sharing it with friends like you makes it okay. ❤
    Like · Reply · October 23 at 1:00am

    Tammy James Quinn Thought provoking Kim. I have meltdowns occasionally but I haven't addressed them as you have. I'm a work in progress and learning a lot from my friend Kim Henson. Thank you!❤
    Love · Reply · 2 · October 22 at 5:02pm

    Kim Henson Tammy James Quinn, I'm the work in progress, my friend. lol 🙂 Can you believe I share this stuff? Sometimes I think "delete this and go into interior design or something." Thanks for showing up and being an encouragement! ❤ I doubt I'd keep blogging if not for friends like you.
    Like · Reply · 2 · October 23 at 1:03am

    Mary Catherine Sargent Thank You Kim. This is perfect timing for me right now. I will read this a few times, learn to like myself, letting go of remarks others make.
    Love · Reply · 1 · October 22 at 5:11pm

    Kim Henson Mary Catherine Sargent, I appreciate when something comes at just the right time. I sure hope this helps. It helped me to write and share it. I love our friendship. ❤
    Like · Reply · 1 · October 23 at 12:16pm · Edited

    Donna Feddick Fagerstrom This is SO good Kim. I think if we were all as honest as you we too, would find ourselves in need of a meltdown!❤️
    Love · Reply · 1 · October 22 at 6:04pm

    Kim Henson Awe, thanks, Donna Feddick Fagerstrom. It helps me so much to write this stuff and to have friends like you read it and comment. ❤ I appreciate you and your friendship.
    Like · Reply · 1 · October 23 at 12:16pm

    Kimberly Duncan I've been having a meltdown for 23 years.
    Haha · Reply · 1 · October 22 at 6:27pm

    Kim Henson Me too, Kimberly Duncan. Oh, wait, mine's been 45 years. I didn't know if that was too much to share in my blog post, though. 😉
    Like · Reply · October 23 at 12:17pm

    Debbie Yarborough Coats Walters Thank you Kim. I see myself in much of it. I have that "smile" on standby at all times. But I am familiar with the meltdowns and the benefits they bring.
    Love · Reply · 1 · October 22 at 6:50pm

    Kim Henson Debbie Yarborough Coats Walters, the benefit to writing this piece is to know I'm not alone. I figured friends could relate, but it's comforting to see it in comment after comment. We really are so much more alike than we are different. ❤
    Like · Reply · October 23 at 12:19pm

    Karen Beachum Gatesman Kim I can relate to this in a big way. Except my meltdowns aren't always helpful. I get frustrated and upset and then I wonder what I could have done differently when I may not have even been the one at fault so what am I doing wrong in that situation
    Love · Reply · 1 · October 22 at 8:37pm

    Karen Beachum Gatesman I am always being told that I need to get a thicker skin
    Love · Reply · 1 · October 22 at 8:40pm

    Kim Henson Karen Beachum Gatesman, you know I can relate. One of my biggest problems has been self-doubt, which means when I confronted an issue with someone, I wouldn't just say what I had to say and leave. I'd argue and defend myself and get confused and react and on and on until they turned it around on me. I don't practice this perfectly, but it works best for me when I tell others what I'm bothered by and how I feel about it and then LEAVE – get out of the room or the house or the town. 🙂 The comments like "you need to grow a thicker skin" or any other accusations they aim at us is a way to distract us, get us into an argument, or make us feel like we're the problem. I think it's the way they keep us and them from feeling our feelings, telling them how we feel, and addressing the real problem. It's hard to stay in touch with our feelings when someone is hurting them, but it's been the only way I've healed some. ❤ Love you!
    Like · Reply · 1 · October 23 at 12:30pm · Edited

    Lucille Zimmerman Sharing. Thank you.
    Love · Reply · 1 · October 23 at 2:52pm

    Kim Henson Thanks so much, Lucille Zimmerman. I appreciate it.
    Like · Reply · October 23 at 3:03pm

    Stacy Garceau 100% relate to this.
    Love · Reply · 1 · October 23 at 9:48pm

    Kim Henson Thanks for stopping by and commenting, Stacy Garceau! ❤
    Like · Reply · October 23 at 10:41pm

    Lyn Snyder Meltdowns are okay. You said you have to be able to ask questions about the meltdowns. It is so true to have a meltdown and still know what you are doing. It is a hard lesson to learn, but you will find you will have less meltdowns because you are aware that it is coming so we learn to talk, cry, stomp feet before it get's to bad.
    We always are somewhat ashamed of meltdowns instead of embracing them; knowing we will get better and better.
    Thanks for the post!! #weareinthistogether#loveyou🙏🙏💞😘😍
    Love · Reply · 2 · October 23 at 10:53pm

    Kim Henson You're right, Lyn Snyder. I think we're a little ashamed, but we don't need to be. If we're honest, I bet we're all having them. It's so much better to be in this together and talking about what's happening so we can help each other. ❤ Thanks for being an honest friend who's here through laughter AND meltdowns. I love you! #youremyangel 😇
    Like · Reply · 1 · October 23 at 11:55pm

    Lyn Snyder Kim Henson , you are my angel!!!
    Love · Reply · 1 · 17 hrs

    Kim Henson Lyn Snyder, we're co-angels! 😇😇 Oh, wait, maybe we're Charlie's Angels. 🤣
    Like · Reply · 13 hrs

    Karen Dishman Jantzi I agree that meltdowns can be the catalyst for good change. There is one caution and that is that in the process, when the governors are off, things can be said that are hurtful and cannot be taken back. Meltdowns should not be a free for all where all good sense and principle is thrown to the wind. They are an opportunity to express what has needed to be expressed and brought to the surface. The danger is they come with extremely heightened emotions. This is one of the benefits of having a coach where you have a safe place to let it go without the possibility of hurting the people you love. Once it’s out, you can mange what you feel. You can take it apart and begin the process of change. GREAT POST, sweet friend! I love it!! I’m sharing!
    Love · Reply · 1 · October 24 at 11:27am

    Kim Henson Awe, thanks, Karen Dishman Jantzi! ❤ I love what you said here, "They are an opportunity to express what has needed to be expressed and brought to the surface." You get it! That's exactly what I was saying. I appreciate your warning also because emoti…See More
    Like · Reply · 13 hrs

    Rebecca Barnes-Hogg Another great post, Kim. I’ve always felt that meltdowns help us release what is causing pain and holding us back. The trick is allowing the meltdown sooner, rather than later. The sooner we melt and release, the recovery is faster and less like that hangover feeling you describe.
    Love · Reply · 1 · October 24 at 10:46pm

    Kim Henson I love this, Rebecca Barnes-Hogg. You're absolutely right. That'd mean I would have to stop sticking my head in the sand when it comes to my emotions. That's happening more often than not these days, so I may actually get to this point. I appreciate the insight in your comment! ❤
    Like · Reply · 13 hrs

    Susan Blanton Roche Thank you for writing a blog that most of us can relate to in one way or another. My meltdown was almost 23 years ago to the day! Funny how one remembers such a thing. I totally in every way, broke down. I never thought there could be such hurt, such pain and feeling so totally hopeless. I cried, screamed, begged for the unthinkable only to be surrounded and loved by family and friends. My heart and mind felt they couldn't take any more only to learn that with lots of love and prayer the sun came out at the end! This may not be the type of meltdown your blog was referring to, but the first thing that came to my mind was this experience. I'm so thankful for the ones that let me scream, cry and ask all the whys! They loved me thru it and never called me crazy! I think when feeling you are at the end and almost lose all senses or reasoning, to know that the healing is coming! I had no idea how blessed I would become later down the road and how the cause of the meltdown would actually be the best thing that could have happened to me. Things have a way of working out. Or, it's all in how WE look at things that makes them turn out that way!
    Love · Reply · 2 · 14 hrs

    Lucille Zimmerman I love this that you did this.
    Love · Reply · 2 · 14 hrs

    Susan Blanton Roche Lucille Zimmerman thank you
    Love · Reply · 1 · 14 hrs

    Kim Henson Susan Blanton Roche, I remember. ❤ It was a heartbreaking time. I'm grateful you had family and friends who were there for you. I loved the story you private messaged me. LOVED IT! Sweetest story of friendship I may have ever heard. It is crazy how the most devastating things in our lives sometimes become our biggest blessings. I'm grateful you turned your life around, found the healing, and now the JOY. I've always admired how you moved on. I love you!
    Like · Reply · 1 · 13 hrs

    Kim Henson Lucille Zimmerman, I love it too. ❤
    Like · Reply · 13 hrs

    Susan Blanton Roche Kim Henson I love you! Yes, Blessed!

    Kim Henson Susan Blanton Roche, thanks for reposting. ❤
    Like · Reply · Just now

  4. Kim, once again you’ve written something quite timely for me. This is certainly not the first time this has happened so I’m wondering how you’re reading my mind? I had not really had a meltdown before or after my husband’s death, but everyone warned me it was coming, and it did. A few weeks ago a number of things came together to produce the meltdown that had not yet occurred, and I just sat and sobbed for hours–something very uncharacteristic of me. It finally allowed me to let go of all the sadness, anger and other emotions I had been holding in for far too long and also helped me begin to turn the corner into my new life. I know I will have other bad days or weeks, but that meltdown was just what I needed. Thank you for seeing into my soul as well as yours and helping me go with the emotional flow.

    • Awe, Mary, you’re a big encourager for me to keep writing since I don’t feel alone in this adventure.

      I’m happy to hear you’ve turned a corner. I know what a relief those moments can be because, in them, we feel freer, more able to face life again, and more like there is purpose in what we’ve been through. It’s the miracles after the meltdown that mean so much!

      I think about you almost daily and hope you’re doing okay. I know so many amazing stories will come out of what you’ve been through. I love you and our writing bond! ❤

  5. From Facebook post @ Thrive Global (Kim Henson) ~

    Betty Butler, Stacy Garceau and 43 others

    2 Shares

    Mary Orth Moss Awesome!
    Love · Reply · 1 · November 2 at 1:36pm

    Kim Henson Thanks, Mary Orth Moss. I’ve heard it’s easy to get accepted and it offers some exposure.
    Like · Reply · 1 · November 2 at 1:41pm · Edited

    Mary Orth Moss Kim Henson thanks for the heads up! Your piece is high quality which I’m sure was factored in to their decision 😍
    Love · Reply · 1 · November 2 at 1:41pm

    Kim Henson Mary Orth Moss, I appreciate it! 🙂
    Like · Reply · November 2 at 1:42pm

    Delilah Lewis Great
    Love · Reply · 1 · November 2 at 2:02pm

    Kim Henson Thanks, Delilah Lewis! Love you. ❤
    Like · Reply · November 3 at 12:23am

    Lucille Zimmerman Woohoo!
    Love · Reply · 1 · November 2 at 2:08pm

    Kim Henson I'm excited, Lucille Zimmerman! Thank you.
    Like · Reply · November 3 at 12:24am

    Susan Blanton Roche Great!
    Love · Reply · 1 · November 2 at 2:34pm

    Kim Henson Thanks bunches, Susan Blanton Roche!
    Like · Reply · November 3 at 12:24am

    Karen Dishman Jantzi Congrats!
    Love · Reply · 1 · November 2 at 2:41pm

    Kim Henson I appreciate it, Karen Dishman Jantzi!
    Like · Reply · 1 · November 3 at 12:24am

    Grey M. Kiser Wow! And enjoyed your piece. Very thought provoking and helpful for many!
    Love · Reply · 1 · November 2 at 3:52pm

    Kim Henson Thanks so much, Grey M. Kiser! I appreciate your encouragement.
    Like · Reply · November 3 at 12:25am

    Karen Beachum Gatesman I had one today. I got so fed up at work I couldn't even take it anymore. No one even cares that anything was bothering me. I can't stand people who will not pull their weight at work. I end up doing it all by myself
    Sad · Reply · 1 · November 2 at 3:58pm

    Kim Henson I'm sorry, Karen Beachum Gatesman. ❤ I know that feeling.
    Like · Reply · November 3 at 12:26am · Edited

    Faye Watson Congrats my smart friend.
    Love · Reply · 1 · November 2 at 4:14pm

    Kim Henson Faye Watson, thank you! 🤓 I'm feeling a little smart right now. lol
    Like · Reply · November 3 at 12:27am

    Mary Lancaster I'm so honored that you are published and your articles are so very informative and so needed for such a time as this.
    May God continue to bless your pen and heart with His favor as He allows the words to flow from your pen that are so needed in our troubled times.Much love always Kim. ⚓️❤️️⚓️❤️️
    Love · Reply · 2 · November 2 at 4:29pm

    Kim Henson Awe, thanks, Mary Lancaster. I need those prayers since I'm working on a bigger project right now. I appreciate your encouragement also. ❤ I love you!
    Like · Reply · 1 · November 3 at 12:28am

    Susanne Calhoun Molter That's wonderful ! Congratulations !
    Love · Reply · 1 · November 2 at 5:01pm

    Kim Henson Thanks bunches, Susanne Calhoun Molter!
    Like · Reply · November 3 at 12:29am

    Tiffany Halford Congratulations!
    Love · Reply · 1 · November 2 at 5:22pm

    Kim Henson Thanks a lot, Tiffany Halford!
    Like · Reply · November 3 at 12:29am

    Gayle Sloan Congratulations!
    Love · Reply · 1 · November 2 at 5:37pm

    Kim Henson Thanks so much, Gayle Sloan! Are you absolutely blissful? ❤
    Like · Reply · November 3 at 12:30am

    Summer Turner Yay! Congratulations!
    Love · Reply · 1 · November 2 at 8:57pm

    Kim Henson Thanks so much, Summer Turner! ❤ I appreciate you encouraging me/us to send in our writing. You're such a good nudger. 🙂
    Like · Reply · 1 · November 3 at 12:30am

    Summer Turner I knew you could do it, Kim! It's a great platform for you.
    Like · Reply · 1 · November 3 at 12:37am

    Kim Henson Summer Turner, it's wide open for all of us! Every single one of us in our group has something to offer! I really appreciate you sharing. I love that about writers. I heard that we're one of the groups who shares our secrets and tries to help along our competition. I've found that to be true throughout the profession. ❤ It's heartwarming, really.
    Like · Reply · 2 · November 3 at 12:48am

    Summer Turner I agree, Kim. That's why I posted about it on our closed group. It's a wonderful introvert-friendly way to gain visibility.
    Like · Reply · 1 · November 3 at 12:59am

    Kim Henson Summer Turner, yes! You're getting us out there. 🙂
    Like · Reply · November 3 at 1:05am

    Mary McKerihan Wilson Congratulations, Kim. I am still trying to figure out how to submit an article to their site. I went to the website but nowhere can I find submission guidelines.
    Like · Reply · 2 · November 2 at 9:30pm

    Summer Turner Mary, you'll find them if you Google Thrive Global submission guidelines.
    Like · Reply · 2 · November 2 at 10:15pm

    Mary McKerihan Wilson Thanks, I'll try that.
    Like · Reply · 2 · November 2 at 10:29pm

    Kim Henson Mary McKerihan Wilson, what Summer Turner said. 🙂 That's how I tracked down their guidelines. It was simpler than I expected, too, which is good news.
    Like · Reply · 1 · November 3 at 12:32am

    Maria Franken Congrats Kim – I read the article and it's really good. I signed up to take a professional development on the topic of Self-Regulation and gosh, a melt-down can be useful! Thanks for the terrific perspective & insights.
    Love · Reply · 1 · November 3 at 7:53am

    Kim Henson Maria Franken, thanks so much! ❤ I'm happy you and I share lots of insights with each other about our lives. I'd love to hear tips about self-regulating our meltdowns. 🙂 Instead of not having them, self-regulation sounds like a useful goal.
    Like · Reply · 1 · November 3 at 12:57pm

    Maria Franken Kim – I'll definitely fill you in on the insights I glean from the course. It'll be the 1st week of December… 🙂
    Like · Reply · 1 · November 3 at 7:13pm

    Kim Henson Maria Franken, I'm looking forward to hearing about it. Who knows? Maybe it'll end up a blog post. 🙂
    Like · Reply · 1 · November 3 at 11:33pm

    Marcie Link Duhon Congratulations!!
    Love · Reply · 1 · November 3 at 1:19pm

    Kim Henson Thanks so much, Marcie Link Duhon! I haven't forgotten about getting together. I've been out of town more than I've been here – grandbabies have been keeping us busy. 🙂
    Like · Reply · November 3 at 1:29pm

    Marcie Link Duhon When you get a minute
    Like · Reply · 1 · November 3 at 1:48pm

    Angie Mojica Awesome Kim!! 👊🏼👊🏼👍🏼🙂
    Love · Reply · 1 · November 3 at 1:30pm

    Angie Mojica And shared!! 😉
    Love · Reply · 1 · November 3 at 1:30pm

    Kim Henson Thanks a lot, Angie Mojica! ❤
    Like · Reply · November 3 at 2:01pm

    Connie Rogers Congrats and thank you for helping to rethink my life. 😘
    Love · Reply · 1 · November 3 at 5:07pm

    Kim Henson Awe, thank you, Connie Rogers. ❤ It helps me so much to write this stuff down.
    Like · Reply · 1 · November 3 at 11:29pm

    Betty Butler Wow, congratulations! That's great!
    Love · Reply · 1 · November 3 at 6:58pm

    Kim Henson Thanks a lot, Betty Butler! ❤ I was excited to get the news.
    Like · Reply · November 3 at 11:30pm

    Donna Feddick Fagerstrom Woo Hoo! Congratulations friend!❤️
    Love · Reply · 1 · November 3 at 8:32pm

    Kim Henson Thanks bunches, Donna Feddick Fagerstrom! ❤
    Like · Reply · November 3 at 11:30pm

    Doris Boyd-Piver Congrats.
    Love · Reply · 1 · November 3 at 10:12pm

    Kim Henson Thanks so much, Doris Boyd-Piver! ❤
    Like · Reply · 1 · November 3 at 11:31pm

    Lyn Snyder WAY TO GO THERE GIRL!!🙏❤️😂💕
    Love · Reply · 1 · November 4 at 7:07pm

    Kim Henson Thanks bunches, Lyn Snyder! ❤
    Like · Reply · Just now

  6. From Facebook (Gina Trimarco’s page) ~

    Wow, Kim Henson. Beautiful and relatable.

    Kim Henson Thanks for passing this along, Gina Trimarco
    Like · Reply · 1 · November 4 at 10:35pm

  7. From Facebook post @ Thrive Global (S. Kim Henson) ~

    Maria Franken, Mary McKerihan Wilson and 3 others

    Rebecca Barnes-Hogg Congrats, Kim!
    LoveShow more reactions · Reply · Message · 1 · November 2 at 8:43pm

    S. Kim Henson Thanks so much, Rebecca Barnes-Hogg! ❤
    LikeShow more reactions · Reply · November 3 at 1:04am

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