Tag Archives: You Can Heal Your Life

You’ve Heard the Saying “Break a Leg”? Well, …

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“Every thought we think is creating our future.” Louise Hay

On March 26, 2004, I slipped in spilled water on a newly varnished floor and broke my knee. In an odd sort of way, it was good luck just like “break a leg” is to actors and musicians before they go on stage – good luck because it got me unstuck.

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I mentioned my accident in a tribute video I posted on Facebook to Louise Hay, author of You Can Heal Your Life. Her message is, “If we are willing to do the mental work, almost anything can be healed,” which she accomplished personally with God’s help. She cured herself of cancer.

Like the quote at the beginning, Hay believes what we think about creates our future. If we give voice to our thoughts and get emotionally involved with them, we’re almost guaranteed results. This explains why I ended up in a full leg cast for eight weeks, unable to drive and incapable of taking my usual morning and afternoon walks.

A year or so before I broke my knee, the mantra I unintentionally repeated daily was “I’m stuck.”

I said it at least a thousand times. It wasn’t until I actually was stuck at home alone while my husband traveled for work that I experienced the full implications of what I’d brought on myself. On Easter weekend, I felt panicked enough about being stuck in my cast that I considered my husband’s offer when he said, “Do you want me to cut it off?”

Most days I paced the house until I was exhausted. I’d end up at our kitchen table and crying because I felt trapped, scared, and alone. I pledged to help every single person in my situation as soon as I wasn’t there myself. I’ve followed through with compassion when I hear others’ stories of also being stuck whether it’s stuck in physical affliction, mental problems like depression, a lifestyle they desperately want out of – stuck in whatever it is and not moving forward.

When I looked up knee problems in Hay’s book, there were several probable causes as to why I broke my knee other than falling on it, the most likely being that I don’t move forward easily. I don’t bend and flow with ease. I could have told you that if I ever slowed down enough to assess my life with ease, but I didn’t. That is, not until I broke my knee.

According to Hay, knee represents ego – an acronym for edging God out. I wanted to write professionally, but I didn’t have any original ideas. I didn’t realize that none of us do. We write the same ideas differently. Like so many unenlightened writers, I planned to pen a bestseller by the year’s end because God told me to write. However, he failed to tell me what to write or who to send it to or how much to expect from my first royalty check. Instead of waiting on Him and writing small until I had bigger ideas, I didn’t write at all except about being stuck.

I obsessed about being stuck, whined about being stuck, and journaled about being stuck for nearly a year until I brought it to pass.

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Breaking my knee got my attention, as well as getting me unstuck … eventually. I still had a good bit of physical healing to do when the cast was removed, but getting it off was the freest I’ve ever felt. It jolted me into paying attention to how my thinking, my emotions, and what comes out of my mouth affects me physically.

Going through the ordeal of breaking my knee and really being stuck continues to shape and heal my life. Is there something going on in your life that needs your attention before it gets to the place where I landed? Or, are you already there and you need to reverse it and begin the healing? I hope this post jolts you to pay attention to how you think, feel, and speak.

In This Together,
Kim

On the side: An interesting article that addresses what our emotions have to do with our health. Click here to read Mind/Body Connection: How Your Emotions Affect Your Health

Thanks for the image, Pixabay.com.

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We Give God Way Too Much Credit

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"The first step in natural healing is responsibility.” Richard Schulze

“The first step in natural healing is responsibility.” Richard Schulze

When I say I stubbed my toe, I mean I jammed it going 5 miles an hour into yet another cement block that got in my way. Tripping over one in a Wilmington parking lot is how I broke my nose

I was tempted to excuse the accident with a statement like “God wants my attention.” I thought about all the times I’ve attributed unpleasant experiences to God teaching me lessons. Indirectly, I guess it is about learning because that’s how he designed our world. If I’m honest, though, the accidents and ailments likely have more to do with how I’m living (or not living) my life. And how I’m learning (or not learning) those lessons.

Although I didn’t recognize it at the time, my “don’t take anything stronger than Tylenol” and “only go to doctor in an emergency” mentality began when an ob-gyn prescribed medication so I could get pregnant. The problem was, I was already pregnant and, under those circumstances, the medicine was unsafe.

I agonized until I got in with another physician. It just so happened that on his staff was a nurse midwife who didn’t shave, drove a VW van, and grew her own food before organic was the fad. Meeting her (and being a hippy at heart myself) began a journey to natural childbirth and an interest in natural health and healing.

I had no idea how to nurture that interest until someone suggested Louise Hay’s book You Can Heal Your Life.

Before that introduction, I was familiar and comfortable attributing my accidents and ailments to being God’s will. Or blaming bad luck and bad genes. Or ignoring how much my emotional mindset and spiritual condition factored into my physical wellbeing.

I think we all sort of know we’re answerable for more of what happens to us than we want to take responsibility for. We say things like “I’m sick over the situation” or “I feel like I’m trying to get sick” or “I made myself sick.” We say about others, “They brought it on themselves.” But when it’s time to do something about not making ourselves sick, we come up short.

Expecting total good health and an accident-free life is unreasonable. Awareness, however, is reasonable. This is where Hay’s book comes in helpful. During a mishap or illness, one of the first things I do is check the emotional diagnosis in You Can Heal Your Life. Hay wrote more than 50 pages to address problems, their probable causes, and new thought patterns for healing. Many times, physical problems show up before we’re aware of emotional and spiritual turmoil.

I’m not suggesting we eliminate God’s help or medical help, but that we take responsibility by helping ourselves.

My blue and aching toe? Toe problems represent “the minor details in the future.” Bruises indicate “the little bumps in life and self-punishment.” Hay suggests positive self-talk like the one for self-punishment, “I love and cherish myself.”

Are you experiencing accidents and/or physical ailments that need your emotional and spiritual attention?

WRite wHere I’m supposed to be – When things go wrong, we tend to credit God and the lessons he has for us to learn, when, in fact, the lesson might be to take our share of the responsibility.